My Father’s Game

Life, Death, Baseball

During his long baseball career, Del Wilber caught for the Red Sox, Cardinals and Phillies; managed 6 minor league teams; scouted for 4 major league clubs; and served as third base coach for the Senators. Written by his son, Rick, this elegant biographical memoir recounts Del Wilber’s life from the unique perspective of a son who grew up in major league dugouts, experienced the joys and hardships that go along with having a big-league dad, and served as his father’s family caregiver as he became terminally ill. The result is a poignant look at the major leaguer’s life and the emotionally exasperating ordeal of caring for a dying parent.

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2007-11-12 00:00:00
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Rick Wilber’s powerful memoir is a work of uncommon courage. In it he cares for demanding, ailing parents while trying to be the best husband, father, and teacher he can be. It’s an impossible task, it turns out, and as he relives the frustration, pain, and anger, we watch fascinated as the drama plays out. My Father’s Game is an honest, affecting book that will touch you deeply.

Peter Golenbock

author of Wrigleyville, Bums, and Red Sox Nation

This is a stunning book. Rick Wilber’s dead-level, achingly honest account of what he learned about himself, his father, and one of our central national mythologies should be read by every baseball fan and would be helpful to everyone who takes on the role of caregiver. My Father’s Game abounds with faith, heartbreak, love, insight, and honor.

Peter Straub

award-winning author of lost boy lost girl, Koko, and In the Night Room

As one of his many writing protégés, I know something about Rick Wilber’s father-son relationships. But I never knew about the one that shaped his life, strengthened his heart, honed his soul. I never knew about My Father’s Game, the story of how a simple nine-inning game could fashion a bond that would last two men a lifetime. I am honored to have been of Rick Wilber’s students. While reading My Father’s Game I realize I am learning from him still.

Bill Plaschke

Los Angeles Times Sports Columnist and panelist on ESPN’s Around the Horn